Russian Language Grammar

    Indefinite Pronouns

The indefinite pronouns are listed below with their current translation into English. (For different shades of meaning, or translation, see "Usage of Indefinite Pronouns" below)

1.  

кто-то

somebody

что-то

something

какой (-ая, -ое, е) -то

some (kind of)

чей (чья, чьё, чьи) -то

somebody's, someone's

2.     

кто-нибудь

anybody

что-нибудь

anything

какой (-ая, -ое, -ие) -нибудь

any (kind of)

чей (чья, чьё, чьи) -нибудь

anybody's, anyone's

3. Of the same, or practically the same, meaning as the last four, are:

ктоибо

чтоибо

какой (-ая, -oе, -ие) -либо

чей (чья, чьё, чьи) -либо

Their usage is more characteristic of written than of spoken language.

4.  

кое-кто

somebody;  some, a few

кое-что

something;  a little

кое-какой (-ая, -oе, -ие)

some  

      plural:   a few, various

 5.  

некто

someone, a certain (man)

нечто

something

некий (-ая, -ое, -ие)

a certain

некоторый (-ая, -ое, -ые)

a certain;   certain

      plural:   several, a few

Declension of Indefinite Pronouns

1. The indefinite pronouns with particles -то, -нибудь, and кое- are declined like the corresponding interrogative pronouns.  

Examples:

NOM. 

кто-то

что-то

GEN. 

кого-то

чего-то

DAT. 

кому-то

чему-то

ACC. 

кого-то

что-то

INSTR. 

кем-то

чём-то

PREP. 

ком-то

чём-то

Remark: When a preposition is present, it precedes indefinite pronouns (except those with кое-): у кого-то; с чем-нибудь; о каком-то. In the case of pronouns with the particle кое- there are often two variants:

у кое-кого    or:       кое у кого.

от кое-кого   or:       кое от кого.

"Кое с кем" and "кое о чём" have no variant form.

 

2.    Некто and нечто are not declined.

 

3.    Declension of некий.

 

Masc. 

Fem. 

Neut. 

Plural 

NOM. 

некий

некая

некое

некие

GEN. 

некоего

некой

некоего

неких

DAT. 

некоему

некой

некоему

неким

ACC. 

некий

некую

некое

некие

(anim.) 

некоего

некую

некое

неких

INSTR. 

неким

некой

неким

некими

PREP. 

некоем

некой

некоем

неких

 

4. Некоторый (-ая, -ое, -ые) are declined like adjectives.

 

Usage of Indefinite Pronouns

1. The particle -то is usually rendered into English as some; the particle -нибудь as any.

Кто-то приехал.

Somebody has arrived.

Вы кого-нибудь видели?

Did you see anybody?

However, this translation may not always be correct: Thus, the following two sentences are both translated with the aid of some.

Он кому-то написал.

Не wrote to somebody.

Надо кому-нибудь написать.

We should write to somebody.

Conversely,  "Do you need something?" or  "Do you need anything?" could both be translated as: "Вам что-нибудь нужно?" It is preferable, then, to think of the -то expressions as having one unknown – X;   and of the -нибудь expressions as admitting a choice between several unknowns – Y1 Y2 ...

Кто-нибудь звонил?

Did anybody (somebody) call? (John? Paul? Nobody?)

Да, кто-то звонил и сказал, что перезвонит позже.

Yes, somebody called and said he'll call back later.

Он, наверно, чем-нибудь недоволен.

Не is probably displeased with something. (There is a doubt about the fact itself and the various possibilities)

Он чем-то недоволен.

He is displeased with something. (Very likely, with one thing

     

    2. The distinction between the -нибудь and the -либо expressions is delicate. In fact, most authorities consider these expressions synonymous. This is a debatable opinion.

    The examples given below may illustrate the marked difference between (1) the -то and the -нибудь expressions, and (2) the subtle difference between the -нибудь and the -либо expressions – at least as far as their usage in certain instances and their proper translation into English are concerned.

    (a) Кто-то к вам приехал.

    Someone has come to (see) you.

    (b) Я вижу машину перед домом. Наверно, кто-нибудь приехал.

    I see a car in front of the house. Probably, somebody has arrived.

    (c) Если кто-нибудь придёт, скажите что меня нет дома.

    If  anybody (somebody) comes, say that I'm not at home.

    (d) Если ктоибо придёт, скажите, что меня нет дома.

    Should  anyone come, say that I'm not at home.

    Other examples:

    (a) Мой брат ему что-то послал. 

    My brother sent him something.

    (b) Он  просит денег. Надо ему что-нибудь послать. 

    He is asking for money. We have to send him something.

    (c) Если вы ему что-нибудь пошлёте, он будет очень рад. 

    If you send him something (anything), he will be very happy.

    (d) Если вы ему чтоибо пошлёте, он только обидится. 

    Should you send him anything (whatsoever), he will only get offended.

     Thus, the particles in the above examples are translated as illustrated in the diagram below:

    Russian indefinite pronouns exercises

     

    3. Кое-кто, more often than not, refers to several people. It is followed by the masculine singular:

     На собрании кое-кто голосовал против.

    At the meeting, a  few people voted against (it).

    Occasionally, it may imply one person, even if not clearly.

    Мне нужно кое с кем поговорить.

    I need to talk to  somebody. (The speaker is reluctant to mention the name of the person, or persons.)

    Кое-что means something, a thing or two:

    Мне надо вам кое-что сказать.

    I have to tell you something.

    Кое-что is followed by the neuter singular in the past tense:

    Кое-что в этой статье мне не понравилось.

    I didn't like a thing or two in this article.

    Кое-какой is seldom used in the singular.   When used, it often suggests something insignificant, unimportant:

    Кое-какой опыт у него есть.

    (Well), he does have some experience.

    В чемодане была кое-какая одежда, но больше ничего.

    In the suitcase there were some (kind of) clothes,  but that's about all.

    In the plural, кое-какие means certain, some, a few.   It is used currently:

    Мне надо купить кое-какие вещи.

    I have to buy a few (some) things.

     

    4. The pronouns некто, нечто, and некий are encountered more often in written than in spoken language. Некто is used only in the nominative. It implies a certain man:

    Перед домом стоял некто в чёрном пальто.

    In front of the house stood a (certain) man in a black overcoat.

    Некто is used with proper names when referring to someone little known, or not known at all:

    Вам звонил некто Карпов.

    A certain (person by the name of) Karpov telephoned you.

    Нечто is used only in the nominative and in the accusative:

    Случилось нечто удивительное.

    Something amazing happened.

    Он сказал мне нечто очень странное.

    Не told me something very strange.

    Некий (-ая, -ое, -ие) is declined and has gender and number:

    В своём письме он пишет о некоем докторе Миллере.

    In his letter, he writes about a certain Dr.Miller.

    Некая дама, назвать которую я не хочу, сказала мне это.

    A certain lady, whom I do not wish to name, told me this.

    Некоторый (-ая, -ое, -ые) is frequently used, both in written and spoken Russian. It is declined like an adjective:

    Я приехал сюда на  некоторое время.

    I  have come here for some  (a certain) time.

    У некоторых людей были обратные билеты.

    Some (certain) people had round-trip tickets.